6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

Ramadan is a period of heightened spirituality for many Muslims. You may notice your Muslim pals and colleagues politely exempting themselves from lunch engagements and turning toward their spiritual communities. Or you may have observed that most Muslims are cheerful givers during the holy month of Ramadan.

The Month Of The Qur’an

Ramadan is called the “month of the Qur’an” because it is a month in which Muslims endeavor to recite as much of the Qur’an as they can. Mosques will usually recite one-thirtieth of the Qur’an every night.

Some Muslims Don't Fast During Ramadan

While fasting remains one of the 5 pillars of Islam, kids and those who are ill, breastfeeding, menstruating, elderly, pregnant, or traveling are not required to fast. Those who can, may want to make up the fast at a later date or pay fidiya; that is, they will feed one person in need for every day they have missed.

A time Of Spiritual Reflection

6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

Ramadan is a time of deep spiritual reflection for most Muslims. It isn't just fasting from food, water, and sex but also from bad habits such as lying, gossiping, arguing, swearing, loss of temper, and others. Muslim Public Affairs Council fellow Marwa Abdelghani says Ramadan "affords the peace of mind that allows you to think clearly and rationally without being clouded by overwhelming emotions".

The Very Origins Of Islam

Lailat ul Qadr falls toward the finish of Ramadan and celebrates the night the Qur’an was unveiled to the Prophet Muhammad. Muslims hold that praying on this day is better than a thousand months of worship.

More Charity

6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

6 Things About Ramadan You Probably Didn’t Know

Giving money to charity is one of the Five Pillars of Islam — and Muslims frequently give more during Ramadan than in any other month of the year.

Muslims Don’t Want You To Feel Sorry For Them

“Don’t feel sorry,” Abdelghani writes. “Although fasting can make me sleepy and tired, the return on investment is absolutely thrilling.”