Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

Mexico surprised the soccer world Sunday when it won defending champions Germany in a remarkable World Cup opener. Apparently most excited were Mexico’s supporters ― so much so that those celebrating in the country’s capital may have created an “artificial earthquake” from jumping and applauding the team.

Mexico’s Institute of Geologic and Atmospheric Investigations, which monitors geological activity, reported that a minimum of two sensors in Mexico City recorded seismic movement about the same time Hirving Lozano scored what would become the match-winning goal in the game’s 35th minute.

IIGEA reported the reading was most likely due to supporters in public squares and parks watching the match and celebrating the goal.

Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

At 10:34 a.m., crowds back home exploded and went so wild that their "mass jumping" triggered about a magnitude 3 quake, the institute's director, Carlos Del Ángel, explained.

According to USA Today, Seismologists in Chile also stated that they recorded artificial activity in Mexico City at the same time.

Quakes produced by mass exuberance is obviously a thing.

According to the director, an artificial quake was recorded in Lima this weekend when Peru netted a goal in another World Cup match. Some 30 years ago, experts recorded a similar event during an incredibly tense football game between Auburn and Louisiana State, earning LSU's now-historic play the title, "The Earthquake game." It also occurred during the 2011 NFL playoff match between the New Orleans Saints and the Seattle Seahawks.

Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

Mexico Fans Caused ‘Artificial Earthquake’ Following Their Team's World Cup Win

And in 2016, Leicester City supporters created a tiny earth shift when Leonardo Ulloa got a last-minute goal against Norwich. Approximately 30,000 fans bursting from their seats at the exact same time delivered so much energy at a time that it made it onto the Richter scale, experts told the BBC.

Del Ángel and his team plan to observe their monitors closely when Mexico takes the field again on June 23 to face South Korea, anticipating another potential jump-quake.

Mexico's goal scorer, Lozano called his match-winning goal as “the best goal of my life”. No doubt, since it caused a small, but literal, earthquake back home. After the victory, fans flooded the streets in Mexico City to celebrate the win.